FreelandBuck’s LA hillside home design responds to a challenging topography | News


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Image: Eric Staudenmaier

Image: Eric Staudenmaier



FreelandBuck has designed a pair of stunning single-family residences, built with a shared foundation, atop a steep lot in Los Angeles’ Mount Washington neighborhood. They are defined by strong rectilinear forms and a restrained material palette, in addition to white open spaces illuminated by natural light.

Image: Eric Staudenmaier

The houses are each 2,000 square feet and stretch four storys in order to minimize their impact on the hillside. They respectively respond to the curve of the adjacent street, with one home featuring a perpendicular façade and the other taking on an angled one. 

Image: Eric Staudenmaier

They both include an open, loft-like main level that joins together the front living and dining areas and a double-height kitchen. The homes also each include three bedrooms, an elevator, backyard, and patio spaces.

Image: Eric Staudenmaier

Image: Eric Staudenmaier

Responding to the topography of the site, the lower house is composed of shifted floor plates that cantilever over the lower levels. The upper house comprises a set of interlocking rotated frames. The second-floor void spaces found on both homes divide their façades, marking the garage and living areas. The fourth level cantilevers over large windows, allowing for expansive views over downtown Los Angeles and the ocean.

Image: Eric Staudenmaier

The interior palettes of the residences reflect the exterior contrasts between the pair in materiality and detailing. The upper house employs lighter materials, which is evident in the kitchen cabinetry, bathroom tile, and French oak flooring. 

Image: Eric Staudenmaier

Image: Eric Staudenmaier

The lower house, on the other hand, is characterized by darker finishes, such as the ebonized kitchen. Additionally, the window mullions on the upper house are clad in natural-finish pine, while the lower house maintains its dark finish as seen from the exterior. Both houses feature marble and oak countertops. 

Read also: Designing AND Developing Is a Fantasy for Many Architects; David Freeland Tells Us How FreelandBuck Did It With the Stack House



















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